Sex appeal: Is it wrong to use it to get what you want?

Is there anything ethically or morally wrong if an adult consciously, independently wishes to use their sex appeal to get what they want, for example to further their career?

The question is more complex than it seems and is deeply connected to the power structures in our society.

In 2011, on the pages of the Daily Mail writer and producer Samantha Brick admitted using her physical allure to get her own way, claiming that “so does any woman with any sense”.

She supported her case by citing sociologist Catherine Hakim’s book Honey Money: The Power Of Erotic Capital, which argued women should capitalise on their erotic side to get on in life. Predictably, some disagreed.

More at the BBC.com: http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/0/24549218

I AM documentary

Watched ‘I AM’ documentary made by Tom Shadyac. He is an American film director, famous for films like Ace Ventura. He had a tragic bicycle accident after which he suffered from the post-concussion syndrome. After months of tribulation, his symptoms finally started to subside. With changed outlook to life, in this documentary, he sets out to find answers to two questions: what’s wrong with our world, and what can we do to make it better? Shadyac conducts interviews with scientists, religious leaders, environmentalists and philosophers including Desmond TutuNoam ChomskyLynne McTaggartElisabet SahtourisDavid SuzukiHoward Zinn, and Thom Hartmann. It is about “human connectedness, happiness, and the human spirit”, and explores themes including Darwinism, Western mores, loneliness, the economy, and the drive to war.

Documentary is also recommended by Hamza Yusuf. Following words are from sandala.org

“If you watch documentaries, this is the end-all. Tom Shadyac is a proof against all of us who cling to “stuff.” He discovered what’s wrong with the world (hint hint: in the title) and what we can do about it.”

Documentary Website: www.iamthedoc.com

 

The great bank robbery

For the American economy – and for many other developed economies – the elephant in the room is the amount of money paid to bankers over the last five years. In the United States, the sum stands at an astounding $2.2 trillion.

Such transfers represent as cunning a tax on everyone else as one can imagine.

Mainstream megabanks are puzzling in many respects. It is (now) no secret that they have operated so far as large sophisticated compensation schemes, masking probabilities of low-risk, high-impact “Black Swan” events and benefiting from the free backstop of implicit public guarantees. Excessive leverage, rather than skills, can be seen as the source of their resulting profits, which then flow disproportionately to employees, and of their sometimes-massive losses, which are borne by shareholders and taxpayers.

Source: http://globalpublicsquare.blogs.cnn.com/2011/09/02/the-great-bank-robbery/

West’s Six Killer Apps

The Harvard historian Niall Ferguson, who has just written a book, Civilization: The West and the Rest, puts things in historical context: “For 500 years the West patented six killer applications that set it apart. The first to download them was Japan. Over the last century, one Asian country after another has downloaded these killer apps — competition, modern science, the rule of law and private property rights, modern medicine, the consumer society and the work ethic. Those six things are the secret sauce of Western civilization.”

Read more at: http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2056610,00.html#ixzz1G5PGRGwT