THE 25 BIGGEST TURNING POINTS IN EARTH’S HISTORY (BBC)

Link: http://www.bbc.com/earth/bespoke/story/20150123-earths-25-biggest-turning-points/index.html

Our planet has existed for 4.5 billion years, and it has been a busy few eons. Here are the 25 biggest milestones in Earth’s history. From leaps forward in evolution to devastating asteroid impacts, these were the turning points that shaped our world.

Indonesian shell has ‘earliest human engraving’

Engravings on shell 430000 year old

 

Zig-zag patterns found on a fossilised shell in Indonesia may be the earliest engraving by a human ancestor, a study has claimed.

The engraving is at least 430,000 years old, meaning it was done by the long-extinct Homo erectus, said the study.

The oldest man-made markings previously found were about 130,000 years old.

Source: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-30324599

 

 

New dates rewrite Neanderthal story

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Modern humans and Neanderthals co-existed in Europe 10 times longer than previously thought, a study suggests.

The most comprehensive dating of Neanderthal bones and tools ever carried out suggests that the two species lived side-by-side for up to 5,000 years.

The new evidence suggests that the two groups may even have exchanged ideas and culture, say the researchers.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28693371#sa-ns_mchannel=rss&ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

Oldest human faeces show Neanderthals ate vegetables also

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Analysis of the oldest reported trace of human faeces has added weight to the view that Neanderthals ate vegetables.

Found at a dig in Spain, the ancient excrement showed chemical traces of both meat and plant digestion.

An earlier view of these early humans as purely meat-eating has already been partially discredited by plant remains found in their caves and teeth.

Diet has been suggested as one of the reasons for the Neanderthals’ extinction, some 30-40,000 years ago. As meat-eaters, the explanation goes, they were out-competed by the more adaptable Homo sapiens.

Source: http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-27981702